Metal-oxide field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose sensing in biological fluid Metal-oxide field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose sensing in biological fluid

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Published Sep 2, 2021
Abhinav Sharma

Abstract

In this study, we report metal-oxide field-effect transistor-based biosensor (Bio-FET) for rapid, label-free ultrasensitive detection of glucose in biological fluid. The Bio-FETs are designed to produce thin metal-oxide (In2O3/ZnO) bilayers using a simple and cost-effective solution process. It also provides a scalable platform that facilitates mass fabrication at a low cost. The versatile surface chemistry of the metal oxide semiconductors employed allows for the incorporation of selective enzyme, which is anticipated to enable the detection of a broader range of glucose concentrations with high specificity. The proposed Bio-FET has good field effect performance, operated at low voltage, and showed excellent responses to glucose. Real-time measurement was performed to detect the glucose concentration from 1 nM to 20 nM in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The sensor showed linear behaviour with logarithmic to glucose concentration (R2 =0.93), with the limit of detection (LOD) down to 1 nM. Therefore, this Bio-FET is a cost-effective sensing platform that could be detected of various biomolecules in biological fluids. We are studying the selectivity test and glucose detection in human serum.

How to Cite

Sharma, A. (2021). Metal-oxide field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose sensing in biological fluid: Metal-oxide field-effect transistor biosensor for glucose sensing in biological fluid. SPAST Abstracts, 1(01). Retrieved from https://spast.org/techrep/article/view/173
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Article Details

Keywords

field effect transistor, metal-oxide semiconductor, biosensor, glucose

References
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Section
SE1: Sensors